Why Turmeric is the New Kale!

Turmeric is a spice that is most commonly associated with curry dishes, beyond this it is also a very versatile ingredient that has a huge range of health benefits. The spice itself is a derivative of the root of the Curcuma longa plant, which has an orange flesh and a rough brown skin.

As well as being used in cooking, turmeric also has other useful properties, most commonly being hailed as an anti-inflammatory in some Eastern medicine practices. The conditions that it is believed to treat are wide and varied from flatulence to jaundice and toothache to chest pain. Studies suggest that turmeric prevents cholesterol oxidising in the body which contributes greatly to the protection of your cardiovascular system. Due to turmeric being able to encourage the liver to increase the amount of messenger proteins that are being produced, it is in turn able to reduce cholesterol in the body. Many studies also now suggest that turmeric is a a great defender against certain neurodegenerative problems, such as Alzheimer’s disease. Less commonly it has also proved useful as a dye for textiles.

Getting more turmeric into your diet doesn’t have to be a difficult process. If you love curry then you can happily slip a teaspoon or two into your recipe; this will work well regardless of the type of curry you are making, be it meat, fish or vegetable. You can also use turmeric in many other recipes such as to sautée vegetables or even in soups.

When it comes to vitamins, turmeric is a fantastic source of vitamin B6, this is essential for maintaining your blood vessels and preventing heart disease. This spice is also a great source of iron, manganese, potassium and fibre. Iron has so many amazing benefits, especially for muscle and brain function. Similarly, manganese and potassium ensure healthy bones as well as blood pressure and blood sugar levels respectively.

As you can observe, turmeric is an all round excellent spice for both its medicinal properties and flavour qualities; one  that should be included in your everyday diet!

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10 Comments Add yours

  1. I love cooking with tumeric. It’s nice to add to a rub on lamb and beef.
    Cheers,
    Laura

  2. Miia says:

    Thanks for this great article Julie! I am not at all an expert like you, but I try to learn new things and eat healthy. I think turmeric is way underestimated (or simply not enough known?) and for example when I had inflammation in my body (due to an untreated intolerance), my nutritionist in Paris gave me some vitamins/tablets that included turmeric. I also remember reading turmeric helps your body prevent and treat colon cancer. I add a teaspoon almost every time I cook 🙂

    1. juliemontagu says:

      Hi Miia,

      That’s great that turmeric is working so well for you, a teaspoon in every dish sounds like a wonderful idea! I hope you continue to visit and enjoy my blog 🙂

  3. Reblogged this on Chronic Heaven: The ProGODnosis® and commented:
    Spicy brain food‽ ERHMAGHERD! lol

  4. Eddy Winko says:

    I remember reading that it also antibacterial and one of the reasons that lots of Indian dishes use it; coating the meat during prep stops anything nasty developing if it’s left out.
    Thanks for the follow by the way 🙂

    1. juliemontagu says:

      Thanks for the info! And for stopping by Grass, Roots & Grains 🙂

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